Michael Berlemann
Michael Berlemann

Featured Articles

Natural hazard risk and life satisfaction
Empirical evidence for hurricanes

 

Michael Berlemann, Marina Eurich (2021), Ecological Economics 190

 

Although natural hazard risk is expected to rise throughout the process of global warming, surprisingly little empirical research has been conducted on the question how hazard risk affects individual well-being. We contribute to closing this gap in the literature by combining geo-referenced survey data from the Gallup Tracking Poll and hurricane data for the United States. Using a wind field model we construct time-varying hurricane risk indicators for 2010 to 2018. We find that individuals from high risk regions report significantly lower levels of life satisfaction than their counterparts living in less risky areas, even after controlling for zip-code-specific effects and for socio-demographic differences between respondents. Thus, when considering the effects of natural disasters on measures of subjective well-being, the effects of disaster risk should be considered explicitly.

 

DOI:10.1016/j.ecolecon.2021.107194

 

Hurricanes, economic growth and transmission channels: Empirical evidence for countries on differing levels of development

 

Michael Berlemann, Daniela Wenzel (2018), World Development 105, 231-247.

 

Although natural hazard risk is expected to rise throughout the process of global warming, surprisingly little empirical research has been conducted on the question how hazard risk affects individual well-being. We contribute to closing this gap in the literature by combining geo-referenced survey data from the Gallup Tracking Poll and hurricane data for the United States. Using a wind field model we construct time-varying hurricane risk indicators for 2010 to 2018. We find that individuals from high risk regions report significantly lower levels of life satisfaction than their counterparts living in less risky areas, even after controlling for zip-code-specific effects and for socio-demographic differences between respondents. Thus, when considering the effects of natural disasters on measures of subjective well-being, the effects of disaster risk should be considered explicitly.

 

DOI:10.1016/j.worlddev.2017.12.020

 

Climate Change, Natural Disasters, and Migration - A Survey of the Empirical Evidence

 

Michael Berlemann, Max Friedrich Steinhardt (2017), CESifo Economic Studies 63 (4), 353–385.

 

Climate-induced migration is one of the most hotly debated topics in the current discourse on global warming and its consequences. There is a burgeoning field in economics and other social sciences linking climatic factors or climate-related natural disasters to migration. Existent empirical studies use different measures to quantify migration flows and climatic factors and apply a variety of methodologies to disparate data sets and samples of countries. Our review article aims to provide a unifying perspective over this complex field by structuring the literature and summarizing the empirical findings.

 

DOI:10.1093/cesifo/ifx019

 

Unraveling the Relationship Between Presidential Approval and the Economy: A Multidimensional Semiparametric Approach

 

Michael Berlemann, Sören Enkelmann, Torben Kuhlenkasper (2015), Journal of Applied Econometrics 30 (3), 468–486.

 

Empirical studies analyzing the determinants of US presidential popularity have delivered quite inconclusive results concerning the role of economic variables by assuming linear relationships. We employ penalized spline smoothing in the context of semiparametric additive mixed models and allow for flexible functional forms and thus possible nonlinear effects for the economic determinants. By controlling for the well-known politically motivated covariables, we find strong evidence for nonlinear and negative effects of unemployment, inflation and government consumption on presidential approval. Additionally, we present new results in favor of nonparametric trivariate interaction effects between the macroeconomic covariables.

 

DOI:10.1002/jae.2380